GMAT

GMAT DEFINED

The GMAT® exam is the assessment for graduate business school candidates—it was designed by business schools to measure the skills shown to help graduate business students succeed in the challenging curriculum. A computer-adaptive exam that assesses Verbal, Quantitative, and Analytical Writing skills developed over time, the GMAT exam is a valid and reliable predictor of success in graduate business school.

Our GMAT Test Preparation Program

You'll learn how to master all concepts tested on the exam by following our proven test-taking strategies and sharpening fundamental verbal and quantitative skills.

Enroll Now to Attend a Free GMAT Strategy Session

You'll find out about the GMAT and the types of questions, meet an expert instructor at Fahim Abbasi’s Students’ Corner who will walk you through some difficult questions and learn some of our proven strategies that you can use on test day.

What’s on the GMAT Exam

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) examination is a standardized test designed to measure verbal, mathematical, and analytical writing skills that have been developed over a long period of time through education and work. The GMAT exam measures these skills in three sections:

  • Verbal Section
  • Analytical Writing Section
  • Quantitative Section

VERBAL SECTION

This part of the GMAT exam measures the test taker's ability to—

  • Read and comprehend written material
  • Reason and evaluate arguments
  • Correct written material to conform to standard written English

Three types of multiple-choice questions are used in the Verbal section of the GMAT exam: Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction.

Reading Comprehension Questions

Reading Comprehension passages are up to 350 words long. Topics from the social sciences, physical or biological sciences, and business-related areas (marketing, economics, human resource management, etc.) are discussed.
All questions can be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the reading material, so no specific knowledge of the material is required. Interpretive, applied, and inferential questions measure the test taker’s ability to understand, analyze, and apply information and concepts presented in written form. 
This section evaluates the test taker's ability to—

  • Understand words and statements in reading passages:  Questions of this type test understanding of terms used in the passage and of the English language.
  • Understand the logical relationships between significant points and concepts in the reading passages: Test takers must determine the strong and weak points of an argument or evaluate the importance of arguments and ideas in a passage.
  • Draw inferences from facts and statements in the reading passages: Test takers consider factual statements or information and, on the basis of that information, reach a general conclusion.
  • Understand and follow the development of quantitative concepts as they are presented in verbal material: Questions of this type involve the interpretation of numerical data or the use of simple arithmetic to reach conclusions about material in a passage.

Critical-Reasoning Questions

These questions are designed to test the reasoning skills involved in making arguments, evaluating arguments, and formulating or analyzing a plan of action. Questions are based on materials from a variety of sources, so no familiarity with the specific subject matter is needed.
This section measures the test taker's ability to reason effectively in the following areas:

  • Argument construction: Questions of this type may ask the test taker to recognize the basic structure of an argument, properly drawn conclusions, underlying assumptions, well-supported explanatory hypotheses, or parallels between structurally similar arguments.
  • Argument evaluation: Questions of this type may ask the test taker to analyze a given argument, recognize factors that would strengthen or weaken an argument, reasoning errors committed in making an argument, or aspects of the methods by which an argument proceeds.
  • Formulating and evaluating a plan of action: Questions of this type may ask the test taker to recognize the relative appropriateness, effectiveness, or efficiency of different plans of action; factors that would strengthen or weaken a proposed plan of action; or assumptions underlying a proposed plan of action.

Sentence Correction Questions

Test takers must choose which of the five choices best expresses an idea or relationship. The questions will require test takers to be familiar with the stylistic conventions and grammatical rules of standard written English and demonstrate their ability to improve incorrect or ineffective expressions.
This section tests two broad aspects of language proficiency:

  • Correct expression: A correct sentence is grammatically and structurally sound. It conforms to all the rules of standard written English; e.g., noun-verb agreement, pronoun consistency, pronoun case, and verb tense sequence. A correct sentence will not have dangling, misplaced, or improperly formed modifiers; unidiomatic or inconsistent expressions; or faults in parallel construction.
  • Effective expression: An effective sentence expresses an idea or relationship clearly and concisely, as well as grammatically. The best answer choice should contain no superfluous words or needlessly complicated expressions. An effective sentence also uses proper diction—the standard dictionary meanings of words and the appropriateness of words in context. In evaluating the diction of a sentence, test takers must be able to recognize whether the words are well chosen, accurate, and suitable for the context.

ANALYTICAL WRITING SECTION

The Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) is designed as a direct measure of the test taker's ability to think critically and communicate ideas. The AWA consists of two writing tasks: Analysis of an Issue and Analysis of an Argument. The issues and arguments in the test questions concern topics of general interest related to business or other subjects. Specific knowledge of the essay topic is not necessary—only the test taker’s capacity to write analytically is assessed.

Analysis of an Issue

Test takers must analyze the issue presented and explain their point of view on the subject. There is no correct answer. This task tests their ability to explore the complexities of an issue or opinion and take a position informed by their understanding.

Analysis of an Argument

Test takers must analyze the reasoning behind a given argument and write a critique of that argument. They are not being asked to present their own views on the subject—this task tests only their ability to formulate an appropriate and constructive critique of a specific conclusion based on a specific line of thinking.

QUANTITATIVE SECTION

This part of the GMAT exam measures mathematical skills, understanding of elementary concepts, and the ability to reason quantitatively, solve quantitative problems, and interpret graphic data. Two types of multiple-choice questions are intermingled throughout the section: Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency. Both types of questions require knowledge of the following:

  • Arithmetic
  • Elementary algebra
  • Commonly known concepts of geometry

Problem Solving Questions are designed to test—

  • Mathematical skills
  • Understanding of elementary mathematical concepts
  • The ability to reason quantitatively and solve quantitative problems

Data Sufficiency Questions are designed to measure the test taker's ability to—

  • Analyze a quantitative problem
  • Recognize which information is relevant
  • Determine at what point there is sufficient information to solve a problem

            FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is a Computer-Adaptive Test?

A Computer-Adaptive Test (CAT) is pretty much what it sounds like: the computer adapts the test to how you answer the questions. You’ll start off the test with a question of medium difficulty. If you answer it correctly, question number two will get a bit more challenging. Get that one right and question number three gets harder still. The opposite is true as well. This system continues until you get to the end of the section and your ability level on that subject is determined.

How many times can I take the GMAT?

You may take the GMAT no more than once in any calendar month and no more than 5 times within a 12-month period.

How do I know if I am ready for the GMAT Exam?

Try our Free GMAT Practice Test, which includes a full-length test. When you finish the practice test you'll get a complete score report detailing your strengths and weaknesses. If you are satisfied with your results, then you may be ready. If you feel you still need help, contact  Fahim Abbasi’s Students’ Corner for the GMAT Test Preparation or call us at 021-34991438 or send us an Email: info@studentscorner.edu.pkstudents_corner@hotmail.com.

What fees are associated with the GMAT?

The fee to take the GMAT is $250 worldwide.

How important is my GMAT Score?

If you want to get accepted to a competitive school, your GMAT score is very important. However, GMAT scores vary in importance at different schools.

Can I cancel my GMAT score?

Yes. You can cancel your scores immediately after you take the GMAT. This is the only time you can cancel your GMAT scores. Unfortunately, you must make the decision to cancel at the testing center before you see your scores. In addition, the fact that you cancelled your scores will be noted on your official GMAT score report.

For how long is my GMAT score valid?

Your GMAT score remains valid for five years.

How can I register for the GMAT?

You must register to take the GMAT in advance by phone or email; walk-in GMAT registration at Test Centers is not accepted. To know about  registration please contact at:
(At main Road) FL - 4/13, Block-5 Between NIPA & Mr. Burger
Tel: 0315-8861133 Email: info@studentscorner.edu.pkstudents_corner@hotmail.com.

Where can I get more GMAT information?

You can contact us here at Fahim Abbasi’s Students’ Corner by calling 021-34991438 or send us an email at info@studentscorner.edu.pkstudents_corner@hotmail.com.

Small Group Tutoring

For the GMAT, GRE & SAT

Small Group Tutoring combines the structure of our preparatory courses with the flexibility of a personal tutor and a small group of students with an experienced tutor in a course that's built around your needs. Small Group Tutoring is a flexible program, focused on your needs and your schedule. You'll get the benefits of learning from peers and working with a dedicated tutor. You'll learn everything you need to know about the GMAT, GRE or SAT and you'll focus on the areas most important to you. By the time you complete your Small Group Tutoring program, you'll be 100% prepared for the exam
Fahim Abbasi’s Students’ Corner tutors have mastered the material and will work with you until you reach your goals. They are excellent communicators and can model their teaching to match your needs. By the time the program is over, you'll know everything you need to master your test. We spend so much of our time studying standardized tests, developing materials, and training our tutors. We're so confident in the quality of our tutoring services that we guarantee that your GMAT, GRE or SAT score will improve.

 



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